Mountain Standards

Posted January 17, 2013

Petzl Nomic: My Deep Affection (Affliction?)

Every climber has a different torso length, forearm length, wrist flexibility, posture and middle school softball trauma; everyone's swing is different. Consequently, the swing of this tool will feel good to some and not to others. The Nomic climbs beautifully for me. It is one of the very few pieces of equipment that actually increases my ability level dramatically, rather than simply making me look the part.



Posted December 13, 2012

Voluntary Wild Country Helium Carabiner Recall

Wild Country issued a voluntary recall of the Helium carabiner on December 10, 2012. Find details in the following press release.



Posted November 15, 2012

Wild Country Ropeman 3: Recall and Alpinist Tester Observations

After spending several months playing with Wild County's new Ropeman 3, I began to wonder if I was using it incorrectly. Should it really be this hard?, I wondered. When Alpinist was contacted recently to help spread the word of the recall, I felt relieved that it wasn't just me.



Posted November 6, 2012

Asolo Cholatse TH: A Well-Made Boot From Boot Country

Geography is a big determinant of destiny. So it's only logical that Italy, a mountainous and boot-shaped country, would be home to many of the companies producing high-end footwear for our alpine endeavors. The nation with a centuries-old heritage of crafting fashionable and functional shoes is home to brands including La Sportiva, Scarpa, Kayland and the makers of my recently worn ice boots, Asolo.



Posted October 1, 2012

Trango Cinch: Smooth Operator



Posted September 17, 2012

Petzl Quark: Alpine Transformer

It's the modular components that really make the new Quarks stand out: I'll start at the spike. If climbing more snow than ice, simply use a hex wrench (provided) to remove the bottom grip rest. This allows for a great plunging experience from a technical tool.



Posted September 4, 2012

The GriGri2: Another Step In The Right Direction

It was 1994 and I was headed to the Valley. I'd saved up for an extended climbing trip and I would return to Salt Lake City with a donut for an account balance. A couple big-ticket items would put a dent in that savings right from the start. One was a portaledge. The other was a GriGri.



Posted July 24, 2012

Therm-a-Rest NeoAir: Compact, But Fragile

In all, the NeoAir's most impressive feature is its (remarkable) compressibility. On top of that, the outer nylon has a pleasant, grippy-but-not-sticky feel that keeps the pad from sliding around the tent; the entire package rolls nicely when you are deflating it; and it's more durable than I would have imagined. But there are a few things that keep this from being perfect in my mind.





Posted May 10, 2012

Marmot Variant Jacket: Conceptually Alluring, Functionally Impractical

I group the Variant with obsolete layers such as the heavy-duty Synchilla jacket. Wind rips right through the fabric, necessitating a windproof layer that makes me overheat. Sure, fancy new designs look good at the coffee shop but this jacket, at least, is not mountain functional.



Posted April 23, 2012

Terra Nova Quasar 30 Pack: Holds Up Despite Holes

Climbing in the Alps all winter, I put the Terra Nova Quasar pack and its "Ultra" fabric through an ice-and-granite gauntlet. While the pack is a little worse for the wear, it's come out on the other side still capable of holding my gear.



Posted April 10, 2012

Petzl Elia Helmet: Hair Hole For She-Climbers

With slim webbing straps, light weight and, of course, the ponytail hole, the Elia offers women-specific features that suggest it may have even been designed by a real she-climber (or at least a man on good terms with his feminine side).



Posted March 9, 2012

Mammut Trion Guide 45L: Not Like Climbing With A Backboard

I have often struggled to find an alpine pack for one- or two-night trips. A pack of this size needs to be comfortable enough to carry up to about forty pounds of gear while hiking into a high camp, yet trim and lithe enough to use for technical climbing on summit bids. Mammut has found a happy medium with the 45L Trion Guide.



Posted February 27, 2012

C.A.M.P. Cassin X-All Mountain: Light, Aggressive and Home-Depot Orange

There are only so many ways of describing an ice tool. Attributes worth discussing are shaft clearance, pick angle and spike pointy-ness—the X-All Mountain excels at all of them. But in reality, biomechanics have a lot to do with matching a user to their perfect tool. And the X-All Mountain feels like a custom tool made just for me.



Posted February 16, 2012

Grivel Monte Bianco: The Pleasure of Wood

With it's classic design, neutral angle blade and abnormally large spike, it seems as though this axe was well designed for meandering through low-angle snowfields thinking about the late greats and golden ages - but nothing more.



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